Prop 84 provides funding for local water needs, like cleaning up the San Diego Bay, and millions of dollars for local and regional water management and water clean up efforts in the San Diego area.

The Salton Sea Restoration plan is not included in the $154 million of direct allocations; it is an indirect benefit to the region. So, contrary to Richard’s statement, San Diego will receive more than its “fair share” of direct funding from this bond, and then some. But I do regret any confusion that may have resulted from the table; it should have been highlighted.

The county will also receive $36 million for two Imperial Valley canal-lining projects that will deliver water to San Diego County residents for 110 years, that, once completed, are expected to save 77,200 acre-feet of water, enough for about 150,000 local households a year. The Department of Water Resources also estimates that Prop. 84 will generate 1 million to 1.2 million acre-feet of new water.

An additional $91 million will go to the county for a number of projects needed locally -determined by local agencies and cities, not by Sacramento.

Water leaders and public health officials agree that one of California’s biggest challenges is cleaning up contaminated water sources in communities. Water agencies work hard to abate the more than 450 contaminated groundwater sources statewide, but much more resources are needed to ensure safe, reliable water for consumption, business and agriculture.

This is why the San Diego County Water Authority – which supplies nearly all the water county residents use annually, and represents 23 San Diego County cities and water agencies – has joined nearly 40 water agencies, public health officials, and Mayor Jerry Sanders, to support Proposition 84.

LANI LUTAR

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