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I am still cleaning all the data off my shoes after the explosion of test scores yesterday. Keep sending me your observations on specific schools and trends in those numbers! Now on to the newsblitz:

The Union-Tribune looks at the data and notes that the achievement gap between students of different races and means puts a pall over all those glowing test scores released yesterday.

  • In our Schooled blog, we invite a guest blogger, local attorney Tyler Cramer, to opine on how schools could better use data from those tests. Look for a counterblogger tomorrow!
  • KPBS brings on the excellently named Dr. Curtis Bonk to talk about how the internet is changing education.
  • The Sacramento Bee zooms in on a middle school where every kid met the state standard on the California algebra test.
  • Giving the mayor control over a handful of Los Angeles schools wasn’t a miracle fix, the Los Angeles Times reports. Schools under Antonio Villaraigosa’s purview had only mixed success on the state tests.
  • The San Francisco Chronicle writes that kids in the city by the bay are outscoring all the rest of us — at least in the big urban districts. But it’s also got one of the worst achievement gaps in the state.
  • Education Week blogger Stephen Sawchuk reports that Bill Gates wants your teacher to be better and he’s willing to pay to do it. Gates is sinking money into four school districts and a coalition of Los Angeles charter schools that rethink how teachers are trained, evaluated and paid.
  • Only a quarter of kids who take the ACT are ready for college, the Wall Street Journal writes.
  • Here’s a fun one from the Miami Herald: Broward County schools in Florida are sending their bigwigs — including the superintendent — back into the classroom as substitute teachers to save money. They paid the teacher who came up with the idea $5,000 for putting on her thinking cap.
EMILY ALPERT

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