Good morning from Hillcrest.

  • Happy managed competition impasse day! San Diego’s City Council will meet to break the deadlock between the Mayor’s Office and labor unions over the rules for the city’s managed competition outsourcing program. I report that the hearing could be a test of the City Attorney’s new rules on impasse. The U-T’s editorial page says council should side with the mayor.

I’ll be live tweeting the hearing  from City Hall today starting at a mayoral press conference at 1 p.m.

  • Also decided today at council is the next step in the downtown schoobrary process. Council will vote on spending $500,000 to receive an updated bid on the library’s costs.
  • Our own Rob Davis reports on the Mayor’s Office now considering a previously dismissed tiered water rate plan. Check out our Cafe San Diego all this week for a continuing debate on water costs in San Diego.
  • San Diego’s auditor issued a harsh report yesterday on the city’s street division: Databases the division maintains are outdated and there’s no way to identify and prioritize repairs. The U-T writes about the report and quotes an upset resident.
  • There are three news outlets today reporting that the city has solved its temporary winter homeless shelter problem. The spot will be the same place as last year, a private lot on 15th and J Streets.
  • In news of interest around San Diego County, La Mesa’s longtime city manager is leaving. La Mesa also is considering banning alcohol from public places. Carlsbad’s council is weighing a repeal of its anti-handbill distribution ordinance. San Marcos is deciding how to disburse municipal art grants.
  • Today’s Chargers update. Chino Hills, a city near to the proposed new Los Angeles County stadium, is looking at the good — new business! — and the bad — traffic! — that will come from the project.
  • Last, in case you missed the fun yesterday, I blog about “The Simpsons” and municipal bonds.
— LIAM DILLON

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