Pueblo Sin Fronteras organized a vigil to draw attention to police abuse of Central American migrants in Tijuana. / Photo by Adriana Heldiz

To the extent that any one story can dominate the news these days, the huge caravan of Central American migrants making their way to the U.S. border was the brief obsession of the media – and the Trump administration – back in April.

Nearly six months later, VOSD’s Maya Srikrishnan has been exhaustively tracking down members of the caravan to see what types of experiences and outcomes they faced once they made it to Tijuana. The result is a new investigative piece that delves into what happened to several of them.

Srikrishnan found that some who decided to stay in Tijuana, some who are languishing in immigration detention centers, some who were prosecuted for crossing the border illegally and some who are adjusting to new lives in the United States as they wait for their asylum claims to make their way through the system.

Though their paths have now diverged, they still share something: The caravan helped the migrants realize their own voice and power – which they’re using to fight for better circumstances.

Sweetwater Trustees Gave Out Raises After Budget Warning From State

In 2015, state budget officials delivered a report to the Sweetwater Union High School District board warning its budget situation in coming years would turn dire if trustees didn’t cut costs and find new revenue.

So that’s what they did, and that’s the end of that story.

WAIT, NO, THAT’S NOT RIGHT.

What actually happened, as Will Huntsberry discovered: Sweetwater trustees OK’d 3.75 percent across-the-board raises. Now, the district is facing a budget crisis that’s forced it to come up with $19 million in cuts to the current school year.

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The Morning Report was written by Sara Libby.

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