What’s Behind the Tensions at Lincoln High

What’s Behind the Tensions at Lincoln High

File photo by Sam Hodgson

Lincoln High School

Amid the shouting matches, the heated protests and the closed-door school board meetings surrounding discontent at Lincoln High, the various parties seem to roughly agree on one thing: The tensions stem from declining school enrollment, and the loss of funds that comes with it.

The problem is simple. A school receives money based on its student enrollment, and fewer students means less money. Many district schools are facing similar circumstances, but Lincoln has become a focal point of that friction.

Moises Aguirre, San Diego Unified’s director of district relations, says waning resources have become pressure points at the school, as teachers and administration scrap over remaining funds.

Unionized teachers, like former Lincoln High instructor Danny Blas, say principals are retaliating against instructors who criticize the administration for its unilateral decision making.

Another camp, led in part by vocal parent and former attorney Sally Smith, says teachers simply don’t want to be held accountable and are “using students as pawns to push their pro-union agenda — one that protects bad teachers and keeps good ones out.”

Because it’s difficult to find a neutral perspective here, we decided to check out some of the complaints we’ve heard and ask some questions of our own. Here’s some of what we’ve found.

What’s the beef?

Lincoln has lost almost 30 percent of its students since 2009, down from 2,170 in 2009 to 1,569 students in 2013.

Student exodus is a familiar story, but it’s one that has affected Lincoln’s teachers in new ways this year.

Because enrollment determines the number of teachers a school can carry, and because teachers’ contracts protect them from being fired due to a surplus of instructors, extra teachers are shuffled or stand by while the district finds a place for them.

As the U-T recently reported, some of these “excessed” district-teachers were moved to different schools, where needs were determined to be greater. Others, like Blas, reported to empty classrooms — a kind of teacher-purgatory — and looked for ways to be productive, all while collecting a regular paycheck.

All but 19 excessed district-teachers were assigned classes last week, according to the U-T, just in time for the district’s deadline for finalizing teaching assignments.

Where are Lincoln’s students going?

“That’s the $25,000 question,” said Aguirre.

One theory, he said, is that San Diego nearby charter schools, like Gompers Preparatory Academy and E3 Civic High School, may have drawn Lincoln students.

Still, happy students don’t leave schools — especially one like Lincoln, which was rebuilt and started the 2007 school year with a new $129 million facility.  In 2011, former Lincoln principal Mel Collins told KBPS that the school was expected to “rise like a phoenix,” from a blighted neighborhood.

Why are they leaving?

Lisa Berlanga, executive director of the parent-led advocacy group San Diego United Parents for Education, said parents are aware of the Lincoln’s academic reputation and are choosing to send their students to other schools.

“I’d probably do the same thing if I had a kid at Lincoln,” she said.

It’s true: Lincoln students are floundering. In 2012, they scored worse than any school in the district in almost every category of the California Standards Test.

The lone bright spot in Lincoln test scores comes from its math department, which is chaired by Kimberly Samaniego. In just one year, Samaniego and other math teachers raised student proficiency scores by 300 percent.

Samaniego is part of the teacher-minority that supports the new administration. After she appeared at an Oct. 8 school board meeting to defend the school’s principal, she was ostracized by other teachers who called the move “divisive.”

Samaniego says the new administration has attempted to institute a much-needed culture change, but it hasn’t gone smoothly.

“When you bring accountability levels higher, you’re going to have tensions come from different directions,” said Samaniego. “And I think that’s what it comes down to. Change is hard.”

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Mario Koran

Mario Koran

Mario reports on hospitals, nonprofits and educational institutions, digging into their impact on the greater San Diego community. Reach him directly at 619.325.0531, or by email: mario@vosd.org.

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47 comments
James Wilson
James Wilson

The problem with high schools like Lincoln is the lack of student engagement. The great super majority are not going on to a four year college and they know it. Yet, the district persists in attempting to squish the kids through a college prep curriculum. The kids get turned off and leave and the school gets a bad name. Career academies are relevant and graduate ninety percent of their students. Until someone in a leadership position stands up to the elitist college only curriculum, nothing will change. James C. Wilson, Ed.D. Author, Disposable Youth: Education or Incarceration? available on Amazon

James Wilson
James Wilson subscriber

The problem with high schools like Lincoln is the lack of student engagement. The great super majority are not going on to a four year college and they know it. Yet, the district persists in attempting to squish the kids through a college prep curriculum. The kids get turned off and leave and the school gets a bad name. Career academies are relevant and graduate ninety percent of their students. Until someone in a leadership position stands up to the elitist college only curriculum, nothing will change. James C. Wilson, Ed.D. Author, Disposable Youth: Education or Incarceration? available on Amazon

mel luce
mel luce

This situation is like putting lipstick on a pig. In the end, it is still a pig. Making Lincoln pretty just scratched the surface of it's problems. Shame on the District for letting it get this way. It seems to me that this never happens in the lighter side of town. When was the last time you heard that children didn't have teachers for a class at Scripps Ranch High? Never would happen. But let me tell you, if this continues, parents will get together and a Charter school will come in and get a beautiful campus. The Charter school will have the option of keeping the teachers, with a new contract, or just start from scratch. The Charter school will truly be accountable to the parents. That's the nice thing about Charters, they can fire teachers if needed. Charters only receive 2/3 of what a regular public school does and does so much more with it. Visit one. Also, District, listen well, if you don't fix this quickly you will lose the school and all the money that goes away when a new Charter school comes to town.

mel luce
mel luce subscriber

This situation is like putting lipstick on a pig. In the end, it is still a pig. Making Lincoln pretty just scratched the surface of it's problems. Shame on the District for letting it get this way. It seems to me that this never happens in the lighter side of town. When was the last time you heard that children didn't have teachers for a class at Scripps Ranch High? Never would happen. But let me tell you, if this continues, parents will get together and a Charter school will come in and get a beautiful campus. The Charter school will have the option of keeping the teachers, with a new contract, or just start from scratch. The Charter school will truly be accountable to the parents. That's the nice thing about Charters, they can fire teachers if needed. Charters only receive 2/3 of what a regular public school does and does so much more with it. Visit one. Also, District, listen well, if you don't fix this quickly you will lose the school and all the money that goes away when a new Charter school comes to town.

Dennis
Dennis

Parents won't send their children to schools because: 1) They don't feel it is safe. 2) They don't feel their child has a chance to learn because of disruptive behavior allowed by other students. Every SDUSD school is teaching, but many schools suffer from students who are extremely disruptive to the learning environment and are not at school to learn. That starts with families. Lincoln most likely has a reputation in the community of #1 and #2. Hopefully they can fix that reputation and the Ed Center can support them. Speaking of the Ed Center....what are they doing to promote our schools and compete with Charters? If they are doing something, I haven't seen it.

Dennis
Dennis subscriber

Parents won't send their children to schools because: 1) They don't feel it is safe. 2) They don't feel their child has a chance to learn because of disruptive behavior allowed by other students. Every SDUSD school is teaching, but many schools suffer from students who are extremely disruptive to the learning environment and are not at school to learn. That starts with families. Lincoln most likely has a reputation in the community of #1 and #2. Hopefully they can fix that reputation and the Ed Center can support them. Speaking of the Ed Center....what are they doing to promote our schools and compete with Charters? If they are doing something, I haven't seen it.

richard brick
richard brick

I get really tired of everything that is wrong with a public schools is dumped onto the laps of the teachers. Fat pay? Fat retirements? Fat lazy union joining teachers? Where are the numbers that go along with these hateful allegations? Charter schools siphon students away along with money with bloated propaganda about superior test scores and teachers. Where is the proof? Show me! Where is the oversight for the charters? One fact about charters and SDUSD, since their inception in the mid 90's, 1/3 of all charters have failed, the number one reason for these failures is financial fraud. All the money lost to these fraudulent charters is not recoverable. All money lost came from the districts General Fund, which is supposed to be used for all students.

richard brick
richard brick subscribermember

I get really tired of everything that is wrong with a public schools is dumped onto the laps of the teachers. Fat pay? Fat retirements? Fat lazy union joining teachers? Where are the numbers that go along with these hateful allegations? Charter schools siphon students away along with money with bloated propaganda about superior test scores and teachers. Where is the proof? Show me! Where is the oversight for the charters? One fact about charters and SDUSD, since their inception in the mid 90's, 1/3 of all charters have failed, the number one reason for these failures is financial fraud. All the money lost to these fraudulent charters is not recoverable. All money lost came from the districts General Fund, which is supposed to be used for all students.

Les Birdsall
Les Birdsall

Lincoln High School illustrates the challenge facing the nation's schools. The community invested $129 million dollars in a new school complex but the in-place teaching/learning system is not substantially different, even with computers and tablets, than that of 1899. Too many students arrive at Lincoln without the skills, conceptual understanding, and background knowledge to succeed with high school work and Lincoln, like the student's prior schools, is not equipped to provide them with those capabilities. It is time to replace age-based (K-12), time limited instruction, despite student achievement, with a system that requires every student to master all essential performance standards. These standards include not only subject matter content but learning skills: in listening; analysis; reading; concept attainment and development; writing; problem solving; project management; invention; teamwork; self-assessment and product improvement; etc. As a nation we have been continuously engaged, since the National Education Defense Act of 1958, without substantial success, in an effort to improve the 1899 factory school. What we have failed to do is devise in-school learning processes that enable every student to successfully master their studies. This is achievable and it is the only way to make Lincoln High School, and all other schools, the success they must become.

Les Birdsall
Les Birdsall subscriber

Lincoln High School illustrates the challenge facing the nation's schools. The community invested $129 million dollars in a new school complex but the in-place teaching/learning system is not substantially different, even with computers and tablets, than that of 1899. Too many students arrive at Lincoln without the skills, conceptual understanding, and background knowledge to succeed with high school work and Lincoln, like the student's prior schools, is not equipped to provide them with those capabilities. It is time to replace age-based (K-12), time limited instruction, despite student achievement, with a system that requires every student to master all essential performance standards. These standards include not only subject matter content but learning skills: in listening; analysis; reading; concept attainment and development; writing; problem solving; project management; invention; teamwork; self-assessment and product improvement; etc. As a nation we have been continuously engaged, since the National Education Defense Act of 1958, without substantial success, in an effort to improve the 1899 factory school. What we have failed to do is devise in-school learning processes that enable every student to successfully master their studies. This is achievable and it is the only way to make Lincoln High School, and all other schools, the success they must become.

Jim Jones
Jim Jones subscriber

"the pathways for students to be successful are needed to be bridged" Sending a kid to a school like Lincoln is child abuse, and the only "bridging" these worst of SDUSD schools are interested in is widening the one way bridge that flows from our wallets to teachers fat pay and pensions, children be damned. Sure they can put on a good dog and pony show and cry crocodile tears "for the children", but in the end they are just a business selling dumbed down kids at a hugely inflated price, with the thuggery of Sacramento to make it an offer we can't refuse.

Ryan Ginard
Ryan Ginard

I did a site visit to Lincoln last month with The San Diego Foundation. Providing facilities is one thing, support is another. From what I could ascertain the foundations are in place, their rich history is appropriately celebrated but the pathways for students to be successful are needed to be bridged. I would encourage VOSD to follow up on this one with the Lincoln High Legacy Foundation. They get it and are fighting hard to get it done. Its just about connecting the dots.

Mark Giffin
Mark Giffin

"Lincoln, which was rebuilt and started the 2007 school year with a new $129 million facility. In 2011, former Lincoln principal Mel Collins told KBPS that the school was expected to “rise like a phoenix,” from a blighted neighborhood." Didn't anyone do any enrollment projections before investing $129 million or were they just guessing and taking the "build it and they will come" approach? Something just doesn't add up here and appears to be yet another example of the district not being good stewards of bond monies.

Mark Giffin
Mark Giffin subscribermember

"Lincoln, which was rebuilt and started the 2007 school year with a new $129 million facility. In 2011, former Lincoln principal Mel Collins told KBPS that the school was expected to “rise like a phoenix,” from a blighted neighborhood." Didn't anyone do any enrollment projections before investing $129 million or were they just guessing and taking the "build it and they will come" approach? Something just doesn't add up here and appears to be yet another example of the district not being good stewards of bond monies.

James Weber
James Weber

Teachers getting paid to sit in an empty classroom?. Give them brooms and paint brushes and put them back to work.

James Weber
James Weber subscriber

Teachers getting paid to sit in an empty classroom?. Give them brooms and paint brushes and put them back to work.

Lou Dodge
Lou Dodge

I think a lot of the tension has nothing to do with money. I think it has to do with poor leadership; one with no high school experience and a district that does nothing about it. the leadership uses a middle school 'code of conduct' and didn't even bother to get teacher input to create a high school discipline plan. There are four administrators for what is now a small number of students and they all stay in one room while security has to deal with all the discipline. And Math scores can be manipulated. There are many bright spots that do not reduce a student to a test score. Over forty Lincoln staff members have left in the past year and a half. The students followed them. People say Gompers is an option yet, after 8 years as a charter school, if you are talking about test scores, their's are still pretty dismal.

Lou Dodge
Lou Dodge subscriber

I think a lot of the tension has nothing to do with money. I think it has to do with poor leadership; one with no high school experience and a district that does nothing about it. the leadership uses a middle school 'code of conduct' and didn't even bother to get teacher input to create a high school discipline plan. There are four administrators for what is now a small number of students and they all stay in one room while security has to deal with all the discipline. And Math scores can be manipulated. There are many bright spots that do not reduce a student to a test score. Over forty Lincoln staff members have left in the past year and a half. The students followed them. People say Gompers is an option yet, after 8 years as a charter school, if you are talking about test scores, their's are still pretty dismal.

Jim Jones
Jim Jones

This is best for the kids, that bad schools fail. Now if we only had vouchers for these kids so they could do better than the nearest not quite as dismal public institute of lower learning.

Jim Jones
Jim Jones subscriber

This is best for the kids, that bad schools fail. Now if we only had vouchers for these kids so they could do better than the nearest not quite as dismal public institute of lower learning.

James Wilson
James Wilson

Dennis, It is good to have your appreciation of the solution to high school reform in America. Jim Jones, you seem to have an agenda. Seventy percent of American kids do not go on to graduate from college. In an urban school district like San Diego, it is substantially fewer students. Well meaning board members seem to think everyone should look like them, yet the reality is that most students cannot handle a college prep curriculum. I was one of the group who built the Kearny CTA. iT COULD BE REPLICATED ANYWHERE WITH THE PROPER SUPPORT. That is the subject of my book, Disposable Youth: Education or Incarceration? available on Amazon. Your negative attitude toward career technical education doesn't square with your apparent approval of Kearny CTA. It was constructed by the city school's career technical education department. There are hundreds of career academies all over the country. The problem is that we don't have enough of them. James C. Wilson, Ed.D.

Dennis
Dennis

Hmmm...turn a hammer and wrench? I guess architecture, blueprint design, machine schematics are not part of the equation? I believe Kearney HS has much of that going on right now? Always the menial jobs Jim?

Dennis
Dennis

Wow Jim...maids?...gardeners?...that isn't a racial stereotype :( How about construction, repair (vehicle, technical, etc.)? Everything is always about greed and money? So disappointing. Either ignorant, foolish or both? I'll think of you tonight when I am volunteering my time (4 hours) for the 5th Friday in a row.

Dennis
Dennis

James, stop making so much sense :) You are so correct when stating that SDUSD needs to stop pretending every student is going to college. By the end of 8th grade a plan should be put in place for students that are not even close to reaching grade level standards and give their parents a choice of district run technical schools that integrate reading/writing/math.

James Wilson
James Wilson subscriber

Dennis, It is good to have your appreciation of the solution to high school reform in America. Jim Jones, you seem to have an agenda. Seventy percent of American kids do not go on to graduate from college. In an urban school district like San Diego, it is substantially fewer students. Well meaning board members seem to think everyone should look like them, yet the reality is that most students cannot handle a college prep curriculum. I was one of the group who built the Kearny CTA. iT COULD BE REPLICATED ANYWHERE WITH THE PROPER SUPPORT. That is the subject of my book, Disposable Youth: Education or Incarceration? available on Amazon. Your negative attitude toward career technical education doesn't square with your apparent approval of Kearny CTA. It was constructed by the city school's career technical education department. There are hundreds of career academies all over the country. The problem is that we don't have enough of them. James C. Wilson, Ed.D.

Dennis
Dennis subscriber

Hmmm...turn a hammer and wrench? I guess architecture, blueprint design, machine schematics are not part of the equation? I believe Kearney HS has much of that going on right now? Always the menial jobs Jim?

Dennis
Dennis subscriber

Wow Jim...maids?...gardeners?...that isn't a racial stereotype :( How about construction, repair (vehicle, technical, etc.)? Everything is always about greed and money? So disappointing. Either ignorant, foolish or both? I'll think of you tonight when I am volunteering my time (4 hours) for the 5th Friday in a row.

Dennis
Dennis subscriber

James, stop making so much sense :) You are so correct when stating that SDUSD needs to stop pretending every student is going to college. By the end of 8th grade a plan should be put in place for students that are not even close to reaching grade level standards and give their parents a choice of district run technical schools that integrate reading/writing/math.

James Wilson
James Wilson

Mel, You need to look again at educational research. There is no efficacy to charter schools. The research demonstrates that like private schools the charters use self selection to skew data to make it appear that they have done something good. The reality is that the kids would have done just as well where they were before they went to a charter. If we really want to help poverty kids, let us provide quality preschool for every child of poverty.

James Wilson
James Wilson subscriber

Mel, You need to look again at educational research. There is no efficacy to charter schools. The research demonstrates that like private schools the charters use self selection to skew data to make it appear that they have done something good. The reality is that the kids would have done just as well where they were before they went to a charter. If we really want to help poverty kids, let us provide quality preschool for every child of poverty.

Mike Richards
Mike Richards

Just to comment on one of your "union standing answers", yes each charter school does received State funding (which is the same to public schools or public charter schools) at the same per pupil rate. It's what they do with the funds that are entirely different. Money alone can't change a perception, nor an outcome. It's up to the student, the parents, and the school teachers to motivate and learn. Oversite is done by the authority that issues the Charter. Therefore, if one does not do what its charter says, then it is closed. Too bad that doesn't happen with public schools. Oversite doesn't mean over regulate, nor forced expenditures on classes that have nothing to do with teaching a student how to read, write, or do math, and have a well rounded education with arts and music. Up until the early 70's , schools had the money to fund all of these classes. Ask yourself if this exists today. It seems to me and I think a majority of the students past and present would prefer a music or art class, and in high school, have the option of job oriented classes (not every student will or wants to go on to higher education) rather than college prep. If the unions were about the students first, a great many of the existing problems would never have come up, or be very minimal today. Understand, I am not saying that teachers are always bad, only union first ideology which is there to get more money only.

ScrippsDad
ScrippsDad

Richard - couple of things strike me regards your post: 1. You demand quantification of claims, that I didn't actually read here in the article, about teachers such as fat pay, fat retirements, etc... Yet, you not only don't provide the reports and references to support your "fact" about 1/3 of all SDUSD Charter schools failing, you don't reference any sources claiming the number one reason is "fraud". If you are truly interested, I can provide details on SDUSD "teacher pay" and retirement, etc... or you can look at some of my older posts that include this data. From this information, people can make their own determinations on "fat" anything which is really a qualitative term since I've never seen numbers which define "fat". 2. All the money lost to Charter Schools came from the districts General Fund is not true. It never made it to the SDUSD General Fund. SDUSD does not fund charter Schools, HOWEVER, they are suppose to provide oversight (you asked where the oversight is) as they determine the granting and renewal of actual Charters. The bulk of the money that goes to Charters comes from the same source as SDUSD's general fund, namely ADA, which comes from the state. Then there is some other stuff like Title One. So charters have the same opportunity/problem of SDUSD non-charter schools, namely working within their budget which is primarily the ADA revenue to provide quality education for our children. The ADA money does not take away opportunities for SDUSD children since it is being used the same (I assume in the best case, the administration for both Charter and SDUSD Trustee is looking to the priorities of each individual student) as it would be for SDUSD non Charters, namely education of each child.

Mike Richards
Mike Richards subscriber

Just to comment on one of your "union standing answers", yes each charter school does received State funding (which is the same to public schools or public charter schools) at the same per pupil rate. It's what they do with the funds that are entirely different. Money alone can't change a perception, nor an outcome. It's up to the student, the parents, and the school teachers to motivate and learn. Oversite is done by the authority that issues the Charter. Therefore, if one does not do what its charter says, then it is closed. Too bad that doesn't happen with public schools. Oversite doesn't mean over regulate, nor forced expenditures on classes that have nothing to do with teaching a student how to read, write, or do math, and have a well rounded education with arts and music. Up until the early 70's , schools had the money to fund all of these classes. Ask yourself if this exists today. It seems to me and I think a majority of the students past and present would prefer a music or art class, and in high school, have the option of job oriented classes (not every student will or wants to go on to higher education) rather than college prep. If the unions were about the students first, a great many of the existing problems would never have come up, or be very minimal today. Understand, I am not saying that teachers are always bad, only union first ideology which is there to get more money only.

ScrippsDad
ScrippsDad subscriber

Richard - couple of things strike me regards your post: 1. You demand quantification of claims, that I didn't actually read here in the article, about teachers such as fat pay, fat retirements, etc... Yet, you not only don't provide the reports and references to support your "fact" about 1/3 of all SDUSD Charter schools failing, you don't reference any sources claiming the number one reason is "fraud". If you are truly interested, I can provide details on SDUSD "teacher pay" and retirement, etc... or you can look at some of my older posts that include this data. From this information, people can make their own determinations on "fat" anything which is really a qualitative term since I've never seen numbers which define "fat". 2. All the money lost to Charter Schools came from the districts General Fund is not true. It never made it to the SDUSD General Fund. SDUSD does not fund charter Schools, HOWEVER, they are suppose to provide oversight (you asked where the oversight is) as they determine the granting and renewal of actual Charters. The bulk of the money that goes to Charters comes from the same source as SDUSD's general fund, namely ADA, which comes from the state. Then there is some other stuff like Title One. So charters have the same opportunity/problem of SDUSD non-charter schools, namely working within their budget which is primarily the ADA revenue to provide quality education for our children. The ADA money does not take away opportunities for SDUSD children since it is being used the same (I assume in the best case, the administration for both Charter and SDUSD Trustee is looking to the priorities of each individual student) as it would be for SDUSD non Charters, namely education of each child.

Jim Jones
Jim Jones

"the pathways for students to be successful are needed to be bridged" Sending a kid to a school like Lincoln is child abuse, and the only "bridging" these worst of SDUSD schools are interested in is widening the one way bridge that flows from our wallets to teachers fat pay and pensions, children be damned. Sure they can put on a good dog and pony show and cry crocodile tears "for the children", but in the end they are just a business selling dumbed down kids at a hugely inflated price, with the thuggery of Sacramento to make it an offer we can't refuse.

Lou Dodge
Lou Dodge

well, you could manipulate them by changing the dynamic and instead of having students take the subtest they may not be doing well in, have them take the subtest of the class they passed. Or have them redo classes they did not get a C or above in. This may be good for some students in the long run but it could also cause a sudden spike in scores.

Alex Powell
Alex Powell

How would you manipulate the math scores at Lincoln?

Lou Dodge
Lou Dodge subscriber

well, you could manipulate them by changing the dynamic and instead of having students take the subtest they may not be doing well in, have them take the subtest of the class they passed. Or have them redo classes they did not get a C or above in. This may be good for some students in the long run but it could also cause a sudden spike in scores.

Jim Jones
Jim Jones

Dennis, you are now bringing in college educated positions when the discussion is about trade schools. Trade schools don't create architects out of people who can't do college entry level math or who can't speak well. Trade schools teach people to do menial work, especially public union run trade schools run by the same group of clown that couldn't teach a kid to solve for x in the first place. You can't replicate Kearney's CTA with a bunch of victims of Lincoln low standards, all you do is drag down the standards of Kearney to fit the lowest common denominator, the path of least resistance on the way to a fat pension.

Jim Jones
Jim Jones

Dennis, construction worker and grease monkey aren't racial stereotypes? Since there are already a ton of technical schools around, maybe these kids could use vouchers for one of those instead of taxpayers footing the bill for public union educators to make a trade school every bit as good as Lincoln or whatever other cesspool school they are running away from is? Public schools can't teach these kids to read or write, so now they are going to teach them to hammer and turn a wrench? You'd have to be a Lincoln graduate to think that's gonna work out any better for anyone but the public union "educators".

Jim Jones
Jim Jones

Oh come on, these "plans" to give kids the schools have already screwed up beyond redemption maid and gardener educations are all about keeping a paycheck in the seat and not about the kids future.

Jim Jones
Jim Jones subscriber

James, I am not the one shilling his book here.

Enlightening of you to say that you believe most students can't handle college. I disagree, if properly educated the vast majority of kids can handle our fairly lax colleges. What is the factor that you believe keeps most kids from being able to handle college prep though? Is this determined by the color of their skin?

Jim Jones
Jim Jones subscriber

Dennis, you are now bringing in college educated positions when the discussion is about trade schools. Trade schools don't create architects out of people who can't do college entry level math or who can't speak well. Trade schools teach people to do menial work, especially public union run trade schools run by the same group of clown that couldn't teach a kid to solve for x in the first place. You can't replicate Kearney's CTA with a bunch of victims of Lincoln low standards, all you do is drag down the standards of Kearney to fit the lowest common denominator, the path of least resistance on the way to a fat pension.

Jim Jones
Jim Jones subscriber

Dennis, construction worker and grease monkey aren't racial stereotypes? Since there are already a ton of technical schools around, maybe these kids could use vouchers for one of those instead of taxpayers footing the bill for public union educators to make a trade school every bit as good as Lincoln or whatever other cesspool school they are running away from is? Public schools can't teach these kids to read or write, so now they are going to teach them to hammer and turn a wrench? You'd have to be a Lincoln graduate to think that's gonna work out any better for anyone but the public union "educators".

Jim Jones
Jim Jones subscriber

Oh come on, these "plans" to give kids the schools have already screwed up beyond redemption maid and gardener educations are all about keeping a paycheck in the seat and not about the kids future.

Jim Jones
Jim Jones

Preschool is another scheme by unions to get more tax money, it doesn't work, it gives kids no advantage. Vouchers work, all the rest of it is just union greed.

Jim Jones
Jim Jones subscriber

Preschool is another scheme by unions to get more tax money, it doesn't work, it gives kids no advantage. Vouchers work, all the rest of it is just union greed.