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I visited three middle schools yesterday and am proud to report that no one shunned me at the lunch table. Now on to your daily education newsblitz!

We bring you the text of the lawsuit filed by contractors against San Diego Unified over its project labor agreement and blog that Superintendent Terry Grier is shooting down rumors that he’s in the running for a job elsewhere.

The Union-Tribune reports on that same labor lawsuit, as does KPBS. And the Associated Press profiles Danielle Grijalva, an Oceanside mom who has exposed the abuse of foreign exchange students. The article was reprinted in publications from the North County Times to Education Week.

The San Francisco Chronicle reports on a state court’s finding that California is entitled to test children in English, even if they are still learning the language. It also prints a principal’s plea for schools to not cut music programs.

The Los Angeles Times takes a big picture look at how funding cuts could threaten the reputation and reality of California’s public university system. And the Contra Costa Times delves into an issue that has also troubled San Diego Unified — whether allowing parents to raise money for individual schools adds to inequities between rich and poor kids.

Education Week reports on complaints that the process of hashing out national education standards hasn’t been as transparent as it should be, and blogs about the curious disappearance of four little words from the education debate: No Child Left Behind.

And the Wall Street Journal editorializes on the political staring contest over the competitive stimulus money that the Obama Administration is dangling before states. Union leaders have said that “charter schools and merit pay raise difficult issues … yet Education Secretary Arne Duncan has said that states that block these reforms could jeopardize their grant eligibility. We’ll see who blinks first.”

EMILY ALPERT

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