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This is your last newsblitz for the week before I head up to the Alpert family homestead. Drive safe, be thankful and don’t overdose on the cranberry relish:

  • We blog that the teachers union in San Diego Unified won a controversial rule to limit workloads. It had proved one of the toughest issues at the bargaining table between the union and the school district, with critics fearing that the rule would hamstring principals and schools from making changes. Bargaining is still continuing over other issues, nearly a year and a half after teachers’ last contract was due to expire.
  • The Union-Tribune reports that a state appellate court ruled that part of a settlement with a former MiraCosta College president was an illegal expenditure of public money, defying a lower court ruling. You might remember this as part of Palmgate and its aftermath.
  • The UT also reports on the different ways that schools are handling Thanksgiving, including taking it as an opportunity to teach kids more about American Indian cultures.
  • A Vista community clinic is recruiting teens to talk about the dangers of cyberspace, the North County Times writes.
  • KPBS asks: Will corporate sponsors help save education? And should they?
  • University of California, Davis students ended their standoff with school officials over tuition hikes on Tuesday night, the Sacramento Bee reports.
  • The Fresno Bee writes about the changes in California law that legislators are trying to make for a chance at snagging more school stimulus dollars.
  • San Ramon Valley schools may seek a loan to install solar panels, Bay Area News Group reports. The question of how to pay for going solar has also come up in San Diego.
  • Education Next hosts an online debate over the nagging question: Can schools alone solve poor kids’ problems? Or must schools take on broader issues such as health and counseling to close the gap?
  • Another blog looks at what happens when some kids can spit back information on tests but don’t understand it — and other kids understand it but can’t spit the information out.
  • The Washington Post opines that a legal ruling should put to rest the idea that D.C. schools Chancellor Michelle Rhee manufactured a budget crisis to get rid of teachers she didn’t want.
  • And for you number nerds: Thanksgiving by the numbers. (Hat tip to Math for America for tweeting it!) Happy Turkey Day, everyone.
EMILY ALPERT

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