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The Denver Post is turning its attention to the border in a multi-part series that began Sunday. With a San Diego dateline, the Post checks into the local border fence and how well it’s working.

A 10-foot-high wall snakes along the U.S.-Mexico border south of here, and behind it another fence, steel mesh and even higher. Cameras sit atop 50-foot poles, and stadium lights can turn night here to day. It’s a daunting sight that looks utterly secure.

Until you notice the dozens of divots.

“Everywhere you see a divot, that’s where someone has gone over with a ladder,” said Damon Foreman, a young Border Patrol agent, pointing to the nicks across the top of the secondary fence.

Sold for $5 on the Mexican side, the ladders are made of rebar and can be carried with one hand at a quick run.

“Ten guys are over that fence in a minute,” Foreman said.

For Department of Homeland Security officials trying to secure the country’s land borders, it’s a hard lesson: A $5 ladder trumps a $30 million fence.

ROB DAVIS

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