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Statement: “District 3 has the lowest per capita income of any in San Diego,” City Councilman Todd Gloria said Sept. 14 at a debate over Proposition D, the sales tax increase on the November ballot.

Determination: True

Analysis: Proposition D opponents have emphasized the economic slump as one of the main arguments against increasing the sales tax. They argue that residents can’t afford to pay anything more for their goods and services under current conditions.

At a debate last week with City Councilman Carl DeMaio, one of Prop. D’s main opponents, Gloria argued that even the city’s poorest residents — his constituents in District 3 — would benefit from paying more taxes and preventing further cuts to city services.

We wanted to check out whether Gloria’s district actually includes the city’s poorest residents and in fact, that assertion’s accurate, according to the most recent Sandag estimates. Gloria’s district includes the following neighborhoods: Hillcrest, University Heights, North Park, South Park, Golden Hill, Normal Heights, City Heights, Kensington and Talmadge.

Here’s the breakdown of each district estimated by median household income:

• District 1: $108,561

• District 2: $64,754

District 3: $48,272

• District 4: $59,191

• District 5: $99,768

• District 6: $68,915

• District 7: $68,800

• District 8: $51,748

If you disagree with our determination or analysis, please express your thoughts in the comments section of this blog post. Explain your reasoning.

You can also e-mail new Fact Check suggestions to factcheck@voiceofsandiego.org. What claim should we explore next?

Please contact Keegan Kyle directly at keegan.kyle@voiceofsandiego.org or 619.550.5668 and follow him on Twitter: twitter.com/keegankyle.

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