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San Diego State University / Photo by Adriana Heldiz

These were the most popular Voice of San Diego stories for the week.

1. SDSU Professor Has Racked Up Disturbing Complaints From Students

Patrick Walders, director of choral studies at SDSU, is on paid administrative leave pending an investigation related to an allegation he had a sexual relationship with one of his students. Over the past several months, former coworkers and students of Walders have come forward to share stories of how they say he wields his influence in inappropriate ways. (Kinsee Morlan)

2. Sweetwater Found a Principal to Be ‘Abusive’ But Kept Him on for Years

A district investigation into employee complaints against principal Ernesto Zamudio in 2014 and 2015 determined there was “ample evidence” his conduct was “abusive,” but not illegal, records show. He was transferred twice and agreed to resign this year, following six months of paid leave. (Ashly McGlone)

3. There’s Virtually No Such Thing as Voluntary Sex Work, Says DA

San Diego DA Summer Stephan, who’s touted her experience combating sex trafficking as part of her re-election campaign, has said that women involved in sex work rarely choose it on their own volition. Other California prosecutors have begun to take the same approach. But Stephan’s opponent says that view is elitist. (Mario Koran)

4. It’s Not Just the ‘Sanctuary State’ Bill: The Trump Lawsuit Challenges These Laws Too

Most discussion of the clash between the federal government and the state — which the San Diego County Board of Supervisors is considering jumping into — has centered on The California Values Act. But the Trump administration is targeting two other policies that deal with work site inspections and detention facilities. (Maya Srikrishnan)

5. ‘Don’t Wait for the District to Do the Right Thing’

Christy Heiskala’s daughter was abused by her Carlsbad elementary school teacher, a crime for which he eventually received prison time. Angered by the barriers to justice she encountered from the school district and law enforcement, Heiskala now trains families and schools how to spot predatory behavior. (Ashly McGlone)

6. Culture Report: The Vinyl Resurgence Is Real

Could art be the key to making elevator rides less awkward? Plus: Arts boosters are relieved by the mayor’s budget, San Diego’s first-ever weed fest is happening (guess what day) and more in our weekly digest of the region’s arts and culture news. (Kinsee Morlan)

7. I Made it in San Diego: The Making of a Local Music Legend

On top of local music legend The Casbah, Tim Mays has opened several bars, restaurants and businesses in San Diego – including Starlite restaurant, Vinyl Junkies record store and Krakatoa coffee shop. (Dallas McLaughlin)

8. Politics Report: South Bay Beefs

The great skirmish between local unions makes its way to a complicated ballot measure battle in National City. Also in the South Bay: a sales tax splits conservatives. And a coastal City Council candidate tries to thread the needle of supporting housing without upsetting neighbors. (Andrew Keatts and Scott Lewis)

9. Former NMA Head, Barred From Leading Group, Complains of ‘Iraqi Style Coupe d’etat’

A recent analysis found 57,000 of the region’s homes are vacation or second homes that often sit vacant, exacerbating the housing crisis because they’re unavailable to people who live and work here or would like to. (Andrew Keatts)

10. Restraining Inmates in Labor Is Supposed to Be the Exception — in San Diego, It’s the Norm

State law prohibits restraints “by the wrists, ankles, or both” during labor, delivery and recovery unless an inmate’s deemed a threat to herself or others. Yet the Sheriff’s Department says it restrains all inmates as a default. (Kelly Davis)

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