‘I See a Lot of Underserved Populations in San Diego’

‘I See a Lot of Underserved Populations in San Diego’

Photo by Sam Hodgson

Pradeep Khosla is chancellor of the University of California, San Diego.

If America doesn’t change its provision of education to its poor residents, the effects on democracy, health, crime and economic growth will eventually drive it into third-world status, says Pradeep Khosla, chancellor of UC San Diego.

The school’s liaison with the outside world began in his role last year, and has used the platform to advocate for combating unequal access to education in San Diego and in higher learning in general.

Meanwhile, he’s dealing with a UC San Diego research budget that’s been cut, he says, by nearly 10 percent because of so-called sequestration cuts, and an ongoing desire to make the La Jolla campus a “student-first university.”

Khosla and I spoke about those issues, and UC San Diego’s role in the regional economy.

I know you’ve said previously that you’d like to use your role at UC San Diego to focus attention on the effects of income inequality. It’s interesting to me that UC San Diego is regarded as having a major role nationally and internationally on climate change. What will it take to make UCSD similarly regarded on an entirely different global phenomenon?

Right. So I just want to make one clarification: I’m not going to fix income inequality. [Laughs] What I want to say is: Unequal access to education because of income — right? — as in poor people who can’t afford to go to school.

And, the reason I think, Andrew, that is so important, not just to me, but to this country in general, is because education is one of the enablers of moving from — it’s one of the enablers of social mobility. And, this country has done an amazing job of social mobility post-World War II. And because of that, we’ve been able to generate a lot of wealth, which generates a lot of upward mobility and feeds into itself.

Right now I’m concerned that we’re at a point right now where your income is deciding more than it should: whether you can go to school or not. And if we keep on going down that path, I think we’ll become a country where only the rich get educated and the poor don’t, and it won’t be the great democracy that it is, and will become in my mind, a Third World country.

Economists have increasingly focused on how income inequality not only has effects on health and crime, and those sorts of socioeconomic issues, but also on economic growth in general.

Right, and also on democracy. If you think about it, the issues we face are becoming more and more sophisticated. And we need to have people who are able to think through these issues before they take a position.

Photo by Sam Hodgson

Photo by Sam Hodgson

So as chancellor, how do you think you can use your role to spark that conversation or affect change?

I think just talking about it, as part of conversation, and you can tell: I mean, because I’ve been talking about it, you feel the need to ask me a little bit more about it. This morning I had a conversation with the group LEAD — L-E-A-D — and they wanted me to come talk to their leadership about access to education, and social justice, and what role UC San Diego can play in that area.

Secondly, I think since we do raise a lot of money, philanthropic money for various projects, and I want one of those projects to be undergraduate scholarships, which is a different way of saying access to education, for those who are qualified.

Meaning, rather than a symbolic role, actually using your role as a fundraiser to diminish some percentage of the problem locally?

Exactly right. And thirdly, one of the things I’ve been doing is talking to the various high schools out here, seeing if there’s a way for us to offer our freshman-level courses to the high schools so that we partner with them, and allow for a smoother transition from high school to UC San Diego.

When we talk about income inequality, it’s usually in a global or national context. What about in a local context? Certainly the cost of living in San Diego is very high. Do you have any take on what San Diego’s relative level of income inequality is?

I don’t have an understanding of relatively if San Diego is better or not, but I can tell you that I see a lot of underserved populations in San Diego.

Should that be a priority for UC San Diego, to …

It is a priority for UC San Diego. For example, if you look at our hospital, when people think of UC San Diego they rarely think of the hospital, but they should. Nearly — and I need to check this number — but if I remember this right, 30 percent of our patients are indigent. Right? We run one of the largest HIV-AIDS clinics in the country. We run clinics south of the border, all free. Right? So that is our way of bringing our capability to the underserved. Also, you know about the Chancellor’s Associates Scholarship program, where we pick high schools and, students from these high schools that are committed to UC San Diego go there for free.

Was this something you attempted to deal with at Carnegie Mellon? Was it a priority for you there as well?

Let’s say: My philosophies have been very similar, but Carnegie Mellon being a private place had different needs than this place. So this place, what I’m doing here, fits with my view of life, and my view of fairness, and my view of the role of a higher institution of education — especially a public one! [Laughs]

Chancellor Gene Block at UCLA recently said the sequester has resulted in $50 million in losses there. I assume there’s been a similar effect of the sequester at UCSD?

Yeah, absolutely. So UCSD, because of the sequester, we had I would say about, 8 or 9 percent reduction in our income, in our research income. But that’s to be expected, so…

So have you been lobbying congressional or senatorial leaders to …

Absolutely. We are part of the AAU (Association of American Universities, an organization of 60 universities that promotes national standards in research, scholarship and education), so I was in D.C. twice over the last month, and I did go and talk to several people on the Hill, also other agencies, trying to see if there was more funding available for the work we do. Umm, but, yes: We are working hard. And we are working hard, not just me personally, but also the six chancellors of the UC that are part of the AAU, and the other 54 who are outside California.

What should be the relationship with the academic world in UC San Diego, which can easily be insulated from the broader civic conversation, and the regional economy we all live in?

I think every university has, and should have, a role to play in the regional economy. With that said, and this may sound like an exaggeration to you but not to me, I think San Diego would not be what it is without UC San Diego. I think without UC San Diego, a lot of the communication industry would not exist. A lot of the biotech. I mean, we have a billion-dollar-a-year research portfolio, half a billion of which is in the medical school. Most of biotech exists because of our research in biological sciences, biochemistry, medical sciences. A lot of these companies are created by our faculty.

So, I think we have an important role to play, I want us to continue to play that important role, and I also want us to reduce the friction of transferring technology from the campus to the outside.

On that last point, I’ve heard there are issues with the UC system’s intellectual property policy and that maybe it’s not as helpful toward spawning spin-off companies as maybe it could be if it was like other institutions of higher learning.

Right. I think what you’ve heard was probably true a while ago. But, our vice chancellor for research — Sandy Brown — she’s doing a great job, and I think we’re making a lot of progress under her leadership.

In what way?

We have now something called “express licenses.” You can go to the website and get express licenses for example in biological sciences. You know you can license your technology with little hassle.

We’ve spoken a lot about your relationship with the city. What are your priorities for student life, on campus?

Priority No. 1 is we want to become a student-centered university. This might mean different things to different people, which is exactly the way it should be. But for me it says every choice I make is focused around, is it good for the student experience, or not?

UC San Diego has a reputation in sciences, I think it’s fair to say, that far outpaces its reputation in humanities, for instance. Is bringing humanities up to the same level of esteem a priority?

Absolutely, it’s a priority, but I should tell you, you pick humanities, but if you look at art, our theater and dance is ranked top three in the country. Our music. If you look at social sciences, our political science department is one of the tops in the country. So I think we have breadth across not just science and engineering, but also in art, humanities and social science. And just like in science and engineering, not every department in science and engineering is at the top. Do you see what I’m saying? That’s also true for arts and humanities. But they are all top 20, I can tell you that. We have 32 departments, and hardly any that are not within top 20.

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Andrew Keatts

Andrew Keatts

I'm Andrew Keatts, a reporter for Voice of San Diego. Please contact me if you'd like at andrew.keatts@voiceofsandiego.org or 619.325.0529.

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107 comments
La Playa Heritage
La Playa Heritage

Dear Chancellor Khosla:

Please analyze our time sensitive solutions to get help for the poor and Homeless within the City of San Diego in time for Christmas..

www.tinyurl.com/20131121c
www.tinyurl.com/20131121b

Former Mayor Filner promised to use the $145 Million in Excess Redevelopment Agency (RDA) Tax Increment (TI) to end Homelessness by the 2015 and 2020 deadlines. He also promised that both the Winter Shelters would be open full time until they were not needed.

Without a scholarly review that this simple solution exists, the status quo will result in a shift of $167 Million in funding from the poor to the City and County General Funds. Please analyze our solution. The deadline is January 1, 2014 when the County Auditor Controller will release the $167 Million to the General Funds. Thanks in advance.

La Playa Heritage
La Playa Heritage subscribermember

Dear Chancellor Khosla:

Please analyze our time sensitive solutions to get help for the poor and Homeless within the City of San Diego in time for Christmas..

www.tinyurl.com/20131121c
www.tinyurl.com/20131121b

Former Mayor Filner promised to use the $145 Million in Excess Redevelopment Agency (RDA) Tax Increment (TI) to end Homelessness by the 2015 and 2020 deadlines. He also promised that both the Winter Shelters would be open full time until they were not needed.

Without a scholarly review that this simple solution exists, the status quo will result in a shift of $167 Million in funding from the poor to the City and County General Funds. Please analyze our solution. The deadline is January 1, 2014 when the County Auditor Controller will release the $167 Million to the General Funds. Thanks in advance.

shawn fox
shawn fox

There is no education inequality. I was poor, went to a public school, had no help whatsoever from parents, and was still able to graduate from a four year college. Public school is free, even if some schools aren't the best ones. College loans are available to anyone who can get accepted to a university. I think that it is preposterous to suggest that people don't have opportunities for education!

shawn fox
shawn fox subscriber

There is no education inequality. I was poor, went to a public school, had no help whatsoever from parents, and was still able to graduate from a four year college. Public school is free, even if some schools aren't the best ones. College loans are available to anyone who can get accepted to a university. I think that it is preposterous to suggest that people don't have opportunities for education!

Jim Jones
Jim Jones

Is this an interview or an ad?

Who will these efforts to get more poor minorities into college really help? UCSD's bottom line?

Anyone in the US who applies themselves can go to college. Taking taxpayer money to pay colleges to admit people who don't apply themselves is counterproductive, all dire but silly warnings of the imminent destruction of our democracy aside.

Jim Jones
Jim Jones subscriber

Is this an interview or an ad?

Who will these efforts to get more poor minorities into college really help? UCSD's bottom line?

Anyone in the US who applies themselves can go to college. Taking taxpayer money to pay colleges to admit people who don't apply themselves is counterproductive, all dire but silly warnings of the imminent destruction of our democracy aside.

Jim Jones
Jim Jones

The opening statement of third world status through failure of presumably bloating the costs of college with even more taxpayer funds for what would be a fairly dubious reward is ridiculous. Any kid, regardless of income who wants to go to college enough to apply themselves can. Look at Alvarez, raised in a house of illegal aliens and gangs and drugs, he applied himself. How does it help to artificially inflate those that fail to apply themselves to the same status at taxpayer expense?

Jim Jones
Jim Jones subscriber

The opening statement of third world status through failure of presumably bloating the costs of college with even more taxpayer funds for what would be a fairly dubious reward is ridiculous. Any kid, regardless of income who wants to go to college enough to apply themselves can. Look at Alvarez, raised in a house of illegal aliens and gangs and drugs, he applied himself. How does it help to artificially inflate those that fail to apply themselves to the same status at taxpayer expense?

Derek Hofmann
Derek Hofmann

Given that poor personal finance skills keep people poor, and that poverty is a cycle, the solution is simple: mandatory enrollment of all low-income students (those who qualify for subsidized lunches) into personal finance classes. They'll be financial experts by the time they graduate from high school, and they'll understand the importance of a college education.

La Playa Heritage
La Playa Heritage

Any type of review or suggestions are appreciated. Please read the 3 page document.

www.tinyurl.com/20131121c

The status quo moves $167 Million of City money to fight blight to the County's General Fund.

The $167 Million in property Tax Increment (TI) for the former Redevelopment Agency (RDA) is being shifted from the local Neighborhoods to the County of San Diego's General Fund. The County stated they would use this one time source of funds for law enforcement outside of City limits. Like Sheriff.

Bit-watcher
Bit-watcher

It wouldn't take a scholarly review -- this plan of Filner's couldn't have worked, and is just more of politicians using poverty and the homeless as political footballs.

La Playa Heritage
La Playa Heritage subscribermember

Any type of review or suggestions are appreciated. Please read the 3 page document.

www.tinyurl.com/20131121c

The status quo moves $167 Million of City money to fight blight to the County's General Fund.

The $167 Million in property Tax Increment (TI) for the former Redevelopment Agency (RDA) is being shifted from the local Neighborhoods to the County of San Diego's General Fund. The County stated they would use this one time source of funds for law enforcement outside of City limits. Like Sheriff.

Bit-watcher
Bit-watcher subscriber

It wouldn't take a scholarly review -- this plan of Filner's couldn't have worked, and is just more of politicians using poverty and the homeless as political footballs.

William Hamilton
William Hamilton

I think we're getting a little sidetracked here. I have been responding to your assertion that "poor kids" can't get college degrees solely because they are poor. Poverty undoubtedly can play a role, but it is not insurmountable.

William Hamilton
William Hamilton

Derek Hoffman - If you want to insist that the only reason "poor kids" don't get college degrees is because they lack opportunity, knock yourself out. But that kind of woefully closed-minded thinking makes it impossible to develop effective solutions. Like some here, I come from what is by any definition, a "poor" background. But my single-mother made sacrifices, and I worked my tail off, to go to UCSD. Claiming that "poor kids" can't find success simply because they are poor is not only ignorant, it's offensive...

William Hamilton
William Hamilton

Derek - If you want to continue to insist that the only reason "poor kids" are not getting college degrees is because they lack opportunity, then knock yourself out. But I think that kind of woefully closed-minded thinking makes finding effective solutions impossible. Like some others here, I come from what is by any definition, a "poor" background. But my single mom made sacrifices, and I worked my azz off to go to college (UCSD) and get my degree. It is breathtakingly ignorant, as well as offensive, to suggest that "poor kids" can't find success simply because they are poor...

Derek Hofmann
Derek Hofmann

If educational opportunities were available equally to everyone, then poor kids would get college degrees at the same rate as wealthy kids. But this isn't happening; therefore, educational opportunities are not available equally to everyone.

William Hamilton
William Hamilton subscriber

I think we're getting a little sidetracked here. I have been responding to your assertion that "poor kids" can't get college degrees solely because they are poor. Poverty undoubtedly can play a role, but it is not insurmountable.

William Hamilton
William Hamilton subscriber

Derek Hoffman - If you want to insist that the only reason "poor kids" don't get college degrees is because they lack opportunity, knock yourself out. But that kind of woefully closed-minded thinking makes it impossible to develop effective solutions. Like some here, I come from what is by any definition, a "poor" background. But my single-mother made sacrifices, and I worked my tail off, to go to UCSD. Claiming that "poor kids" can't find success simply because they are poor is not only ignorant, it's offensive...

William Hamilton
William Hamilton subscriber

Derek - If you want to continue to insist that the only reason "poor kids" are not getting college degrees is because they lack opportunity, then knock yourself out. But I think that kind of woefully closed-minded thinking makes finding effective solutions impossible. Like some others here, I come from what is by any definition, a "poor" background. But my single mom made sacrifices, and I worked my azz off to go to college (UCSD) and get my degree. It is breathtakingly ignorant, as well as offensive, to suggest that "poor kids" can't find success simply because they are poor...

Derek Hofmann
Derek Hofmann subscribermember

If educational opportunities were available equally to everyone, then poor kids would get college degrees at the same rate as wealthy kids. But this isn't happening; therefore, educational opportunities are not available equally to everyone.

Derek Hofmann
Derek Hofmann

If we don't allow taxpayer money to be used to help ensure that everyone gets an equal chance at success in life, then the uneducated masses will vote themselves your money some other way. Pick one.

Derek Hofmann
Derek Hofmann subscribermember

If we don't allow taxpayer money to be used to help ensure that everyone gets an equal chance at success in life, then the uneducated masses will vote themselves your money some other way. Pick one.

Stuart Morse
Stuart Morse

Well, I gave it another shot, but if the editors of VOSD are willing to allow insulting, libelous personal attacks, that have been disproved over and over again, then it is clear that this forum no longer serves a valid purpose.
It is truly a shame that what was once a promising forum for enlightened discussion has been transformed into a pulpit for certain individuals to promote hate, insult individuals. and advocate for extremist policies.
So long VOSD.

Stuart Morse
Stuart Morse

A few months ago someone posted a link to a Jim Jones filter...can someone re-post that link please?

Stuart Morse
Stuart Morse

Well, since you refuse to provide any evidence of your absurd allegations it is clear that you can not and should not be taken seriously. I thought I would take a break and give people, such as yourself, another opportunity to join the community of the intellectually honest group of people. Obviously, based on your inaccurate, unsupported, and hateful allegations you are not ready to join this group.

Stuart Morse
Stuart Morse

Obviously you have no idea what a teacher does during a typical day as your response amply proves. Therefore, you criticism is empty. How can you criticize something you know, by your own admission, very little about? This is evidence of you being a demagogue. If you want to help children, as you claim, it would seem like a good idea to learn about the system which you detest so much.
Also, I notice you offer absolutely no solutions, no constructive criticism, no plan, to improve education. This is further evidence of your demagoguery.
Can you provide any evidence to back your curious claim that teachers do not "want better for the kids". Since no such evidence exists, this is, once again, an example of you being a demagogue.

Stuart Morse
Stuart Morse

Perhaps you can share with us your understanding of what a teacher (choose secondary or elementary) does on a daily basis?

What should the teachers do in order to do a better job?

This would be an example of how to start a productive conversation.... by the way, you really used the term, "Better people"? How exactly would one determine that?

Stuart Morse
Stuart Morse

It is not a matter of censoring. It is not even a matter of political affiliation. It is a matter of facilitating a productive discussion. Clearly, Mr. Jones has little interest in facilitating such a discussion. While I am quite certain that we wold all agree that people have the right to express their opinion, I believe that there comes a point where the discussion becomes becomes dead dogma, and in the case of Mr. Jones, the comments seem designed to stir the pot, almost to the point of yellow journalism.
These are important issues that affect all of society. Constantly droning on about the exact same issue, making the exact same inaccurate, tired allegations, and launching personal attacks at the integrity of educators falls pathetically short of facilitating a productive discussion. Criticism is always welcome, but the manner in which ideas are expressed ought to be far more civilized.

Stuart Morse
Stuart Morse

After returning from a hiatus from VOSD I come back to this same tired rhetoric of a disillusioned, self-proclaimed Social Darwinist? I remember several months ago VOSD made a commitment to encourage respectful dialogue among the contributors. While removing Mr. Carless from the education beat was a good move; allowing the continued hateful, class warfare comments from Jim Jones is an embarrassment to your organization.

Dennis
Dennis

"The SDUSD teachers know that the more successful they become through their own merits the more likely they are top vote conservative, so their incentive is to keep them down, and reliably liberal."

That has to be one of the most ludicrous statements I have ever read. :)

Dennis
Dennis

"Yes, certainly SDUSD who can't teach them grade level english or math or science will somehow be able to teach them finances."

More like many students who refuse to learn and don't manage their own behavior in school.

My own boy in kinder is already reading at the 2nd grade level and my 2nd grade boy is reading at beginning 4th grade level. SDUSD is teaching my boys just fine. But wait...they apply themselves and behave.

Your blanket statements were old a year ago. Time for a new page! (Maybe in 2014 :)

Jim Jones
Jim Jones

Yes, certainly SDUSD who can't teach them grade level english or math or science will somehow be able to teach them finances.

Derek Hofmann
Derek Hofmann

When did I say that poor kids can't get college degrees?

Jim Jones
Jim Jones

"If you aren't informed of an opportunity, is the opportunity really available to you?"

Pointless response, but yes. These kids are not uninformed. They all know they can keep their nose clean, study, and get ahead. They just don't want to, they see their parents living off the dole and that's what they aspire to for themselves. The SDUSD teachers know that the more successful they become through their own merits the more likely they are top vote conservative, so their incentive is to keep them down, and reliably liberal.

Derek Hofmann
Derek Hofmann

"...poor kids have the same opportunities, they have just been taught that it's better to mooch of the system..."

If you aren't informed of an opportunity, is the opportunity really available to you? I don't think you're correct that poor parents take the time to inform their children of all the same educational opportunities that wealthy parents do for their children, just to then teach them to instead mooch off the system.

Jim Jones
Jim Jones

"If educational opportunities were available equally to everyone, then poor kids would get college degrees at the same rate as wealthy kids."

What utter nonsense, poor kids have the same opportunities, they have just been taught that it's better to mooch of the system and skate by on social promotions with a C average than to apply themselves, by the people who find the lower class a useful voting block and emotional foil.

Who has the most to gain keeping the lower class low? The same people who have been running the "war on poverty" for decades, making sure it never will end, because if they actually ended it who would be their next group of useful fools?

Derek Hofmann
Derek Hofmann

William, your analogy is an example of the "affirming the consequent" logical fallacy (if A, then B; B, therefore, A).

Mine is "if A, then B; not B, therefore, not A" which is a valid argument.

William Hamilton
William Hamilton

What utter rubbish. That's like me claiming I have a charm that keeps elephants out of my yard. If it didn't work, you would see elephants in my yard. But since this isn't happening, therefore, my charm must work...

Derek Hofmann
Derek Hofmann subscribermember

When did I say that poor kids can't get college degrees?

Derek Hofmann
Derek Hofmann subscribermember

How do you explain the cycle of poverty?

Jim Jones
Jim Jones subscriber

"If you aren't informed of an opportunity, is the opportunity really available to you?"

Pointless response, but yes. These kids are not uninformed. They all know they can keep their nose clean, study, and get ahead. They just don't want to, they see their parents living off the dole and that's what they aspire to for themselves. The SDUSD teachers know that the more successful they become through their own merits the more likely they are top vote conservative, so their incentive is to keep them down, and reliably liberal.

Derek Hofmann
Derek Hofmann subscribermember

"...poor kids have the same opportunities, they have just been taught that it's better to mooch of the system..."

If you aren't informed of an opportunity, is the opportunity really available to you? I don't think you're correct that poor parents take the time to inform their children of all the same educational opportunities that wealthy parents do for their children, just to then teach them to instead mooch off the system.

Jim Jones
Jim Jones subscriber

"If educational opportunities were available equally to everyone, then poor kids would get college degrees at the same rate as wealthy kids."

What utter nonsense, poor kids have the same opportunities, they have just been taught that it's better to mooch of the system and skate by on social promotions with a C average than to apply themselves, by the people who find the lower class a useful voting block and emotional foil.

Who has the most to gain keeping the lower class low? The same people who have been running the "war on poverty" for decades, making sure it never will end, because if they actually ended it who would be their next group of useful fools?

Derek Hofmann
Derek Hofmann subscribermember

William, your analogy is an example of the "affirming the consequent" logical fallacy (if A, then B; B, therefore, A).

Mine is "if A, then B; not B, therefore, not A" which is a valid argument.

William Hamilton
William Hamilton subscriber

What utter rubbish. That's like me claiming I have a charm that keeps elephants out of my yard. If it didn't work, you would see elephants in my yard. But since this isn't happening, therefore, my charm must work...

Jim Jones
Jim Jones

A teachers strike! What fun!

Can you take more of the SDUSD "educators" that hang out here on occasion with you Stuart?

Jim Jones
Jim Jones

Stuart, I know very well what a teacher does during the day, but it doesn't matter anyway, your logic is unsound, you don't need to be a race car driver to recognize a car wreck.

When you get serious about actually caring that kids here get a good education, let me know, until then save the excuses and silly "you have to be a teacher to know what a failure is" pseudologic for the kids who don't know better and the people who can't read statistics after graduating SDUSD.

SDUSD is a failure of epic and tragic proportions, most people recognize that simple fact, if you don't admit it no skin off my nose.

Jim Jones
Jim Jones

What a teacher does on a daily basis is quite clear Stuart, they produce kids that are at best mediocre in their education. What a California teacher does is produce kids who are at the bottom scale in mediocre, and SDUSD is average for California, which is second from bottom for the nation last time I looked.

Oh, and the one thing the US and California is near the top at? Cost to the taxpayer.

There is little doubt that there is huge room for improvement, just as there is little doubt it will never improve from the inside Stuart, this atrocious US school performance is older than you are, and every year is the same.

"Better people" are those people who want better for the kids. Every shred of evidence and decades of metrics show that isn't the public school teacher, they've been busy codifying the right to churn out mediocre results with very real human costs and get paid dearly for it into law.

Jim Jones
Jim Jones

Stuart, it most certainly is not about "facilitating a productive discussion" for public teachers, it's about pretending while treading water toward retirement.

If discussion could fix our atrocious public schools, they would have been fixed back when you were a gleam in your daddy's eye.

The last OECD report was same as always, the US scores low even when being near the top in spending, and inside the US California scores low despite being near the top in spending.

I understand your desire not to talk about it in any meaningful way, to just let the system plod on till you retire, but can't you put kids first?

In the name of civilization that you invoke, where is your compassion for the kids SDUSD is failing? Where is your desire to make their lives better?

All we ever see from teachers is the desire to kick the can down the road until it is someone else's problem, and the desire to silence the criticism as they do so. Our kids deserve better than that narrow, selfish and evil mindset. Kids exist for better purposes than to give teachers a good retirement at a staggering, unconscionable human cost, and there is no way anyone with any real humanity could whitewash that with false talk of civility.

Fix the schools instead of attacking the critics, or get the heck out of the way and let better people make right what public school teachers have selfishly corrupted for decades.

Jim Jones
Jim Jones

That's what I would say if I was biased. I suppose you really think that I think you deleted my post without seeing the one it was a reply to? No, if I was that gullible I would have bought every bridge in town.

If you want to play board cop, be fair despite your bias, OK?

Jim Jones
Jim Jones

Well, you deleted my reply while letting that one stand. More than just a filter that needs updating I'd say.

Catherine Green
Catherine Green

I'll admit the "teabagger" stuff was a little much - looks like we need to update our auto-filter (which hides posts containing vulgar words) to recognize the latest raunchy lingo....

Jim Jones
Jim Jones

Catherine, I have noticed a lot of left slanted censorship, but I wasn't going to mention it. Trying putting the line near the center, OK?

Catherine Green
Catherine Green

Hi Stuart, we're glad to have you back! We want our comment sections and the Plaza to be open forums, where people feel free to express their thoughts without fear of being censored. But yes, we also want to make sure the dialogue among commenters stays healthy and productive. Mr. Jones has already noted an increased effort on our part to nip out comments that cross the line. We hope you'll stick around and help us keep the conversation going.

Jim Jones
Jim Jones

Oh look, another SDUSD teacher who's answer to the horrid failure of SDUSD with so many kids is to try to silence the people who actually speak up for better schooling for our kids.

Yes Stuart, it sure would serve SDUSD teachers better if you could get anyone who speaks up for the kids silenced, then teachers could continue to get high compensation for little effort, your reliable pro union voting block of marginally educated public dole users will be safely growing and no one would even know, especially the ones SDUSD educated.

Jim Jones
Jim Jones

I agree, I just can't figure out any other reason public school teachers would churn out so many dumbed down kids. What do you think the reason for their lack of real effort or results is? Simple laziness? Incompetence? That paints them in a worse light than deviously self serving, doesn't it?

Of course one will chime in here soon to blame the kids and ask for more money.

Jim Jones
Jim Jones

Every student at SDUSD and every other union school district in the nation learn some math and science, certainly, and, of course with lower standards and social promotion and gaming the tests the schools can certainly make it seem like they are doing better than they are.

That being said, for the tremendous cost we taxpayers are paying, there isn't a single student in SDUSD who shouldn't be doing better, and who wouldn't be doing better if we flushed the commode of public education and replaced it with a 100% voucher driven 100% parent choice system with competitive schools instead of collaborative to a low standard schools.

shawn fox
shawn fox

That comment goes too far. Are you saying that NONE of the kids at SDUSD are learning math and science? That is equally preposterous. The teachers are not all responsible for the mistakes of the school board. Some teachers and schools within the district probably do a fantastic job. You seem to be suggesting that they are all equally bad, which is ridiculous. Obviously some students and teachers work harder than others, and that is part of it. It really isn't that bad of an idea to provide some classes on things like loans, credit cards, etc. However, my guess is that there already are specific math classes that deal with some of those concepts. Perhaps the info just needs to be wrapped up in a course with more context as far as how the math relates to family and individual decision making.

Jim Jones
Jim Jones

Again Derek, if you are depending on SDUSD to teach these kids something anyone with common sense knows, you are doomed for failure.

Fiscal responsibility doesn't need a class. SDUSD can't teach what they don't practice, and kids raised by parents who live on the government cheese are already taught that success equals staying a burden to society so that society keeps paying you to be nonproductive.

Derek Hofmann
Derek Hofmann

"If you give me one apple today, I will give you two tomorrow" is a lesson in interest that even a kindergartner will understand.

Delayed gratification, buying in bulk, and saving money to get something bigger or better are also good lessons.