The potential marriage between rivals that so enraged Chargers and Raiders fans is looking less likely as the NFL kicks off the series of meetings expected to culminate in a decision about which team or teams will relocate to Los Angeles.

Both the Los Angeles Times and the LA Daily News offered play-by-plays Monday of increasing momentum pushing the Chargers and the St. Louis Rams to make a home together in Inglewood.

That’s not to say Chargers owner Dean Spanos is on board – at least openly.

Both outlets report Spanos doesn’t want to snub Raiders owner Mark Davis, so there’s talk of secret ballots to offer owners cover following Dallas Cowboys owner Jerry Jones’ official proposal of a Chargers-Rams deal in Inglewood.

As Spanos stepped into Monday’s relocation meetings in Houston, he told a gaggle of reporters he’d abide by whatever the league decides. Spano’s response when those reporters asked if he had anything to say to San Diego fans? “I think I’ve said everything I have to say.”

Longtime AP beat writer Bernie Wilson had this message for fans: “Chargers are 244-267 in (.477) in 32 years of Spanos family ownership, with 20 non-winning seasons.”

San Diego’s Potentially Costly Breakup

If the Chargers break up with San Diego, taxpayers will still be stuck with the costly stadium check.

Our Liam Dillon’s previously told you about the Chargers’ sweetheart deal with the city that actually has the city paying the team each year.

Now Dillon takes a look at what happens if the Chargers step away and finds the city will save some cash if the team bails but still won’t break even on stadium debt or expenses.

How much the rushed environmental review of the Qualcomm stadium site will pay off, Dillon finds, will depend on just what ends up on the Mission Valley plot.

Reform Trashed for at Least Seven Years

The city’s got an approach to trash pick up that ensures overlap and inefficiency yet the City Council decided Monday it’s here to stay for at least seven more years, Ry Rivard reports.

That’s despite a recommendation from city auditors that suggested switching things up to a system of zones would both reduce wear and tear on city streets and save customers money.

City officials opted to stick with the current system, Rivard explains, because doing so ensures it can hold companies to commitments to recycle more, a major sticking point in the city’s Zero Waste and Climate Action plans.

Pease Flips Into City Attorney’s Race

Environmental attorney and onetime District 1 City Council contender Bryan Pease announced he’ll run for city attorney.

Pease, best known as “the Seal Guy” for his efforts to protect the harbor seals at La Jolla Cove, will be the fourth Democrat in a crowded race that includes fellow Dems Gil Cabrera, Rafael Castellanos and Mara Elliott and Republican Robert Hickey.

News Nibbles

San Diego County’s getting several new medical marijuana dispensaries this year. (Union-Tribune)

San Diego’s Navy and Marine families will be getting less cash for off-base housing. (KPBS)

Officials at the local U.S. Immigration and Customs Enforcement office have concluded an anonymous complaint that an ICE supervisor recruited employees for swinger parties during work hours wasn’t true. (NBC 7)

Assemblyman Anthony Rendon of Lakewood is officially the state’s next Assembly speaker. He’ll take over the post currently held by San Diego’s Toni Atkins in March. (Sacramento Bee) San Diego Assemblywoman Lorena Gonzalez threw some serious shade about the switch on Twitter.

Check It Out

So it turns out a movie called “The Book Thief” was the San Diego County Library system’s most-rented film of 2015. Thanks to VOSD reader Lucas O’Connor for bringing that silly irony home.

Lisa Halverstadt

Lisa is a senior investigative reporter who digs into some of San Diego's biggest challenges including homelessness, city real estate debacles, the region's...

Leave a comment

Your email address will not be published.

This site uses Akismet to reduce spam. Learn how your comment data is processed.