Councilwoman Jen Campbell / Photo by Adriana Heldiz

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Councilwoman Jen Campbell has easily advanced to a November runoff in her re-election bid.

She will now face Republican Linda Lukacs to continue representing District 2, which covers most of the city’s coastal area.

Lukacs, a dentist, did not have a high profile coming into the race and barely had a campaign, raising just over $12,000 throughout the race. A swell of spending came in on her behalf, though, after ballots were mailed to voters.

That spending, though, came from a political action committee funded by Campbell supporters who sought to knock former Assemblywoman Lori Saldaña, a Democrat, out of the race because they saw her as a bigger threat to Campbell’s re-election in November.

Campbell was winning 30.4 percent of the vote, while Lukacs had 25.3 percent, as of Thursday afternoon’s update. Saldaña, and Democrat Joel Day, took 18.3 percent and 13.3 percent of the vote, respectively.

Read more about the race here. 

San Diego’s Cities Adopt Stricter Water Use Rules

San Diego cities are starting to fall in line with state orders that water suppliers step-up water conservation efforts as California slips deeper into drought at the start of the summer. 

Hydrologically speaking, San Diego’s soils, air and vegetation are severely parched. But the region’s water wholesaler, San Diego County Water Authority, maintains the southwesternmost corner of the state has plenty of water supplies. That’s true, on paper, but now it’s up to local water sellers (there are 24 of them in San Diego) to see to it that people are even more conscientious with every drop. 

That’s why the city of San Diego announced Thursday water use moved to what’s known as Level 2 of a six-level water shortage action plan

“Although (San Diego County Water Authority) has determined that the region’s water supply is currently stable, the dire drought in Northern California and throughout the West requires all water customers to help reduce water use,” the city of San Diego’s press release reads. 

The city actually has permanent and mandatory water restrictions in place – things like letting your sprinkler leak onto the sidewalk, or washing down a driveway are always prohibited. 

New restrictions include a three-days-per-week limit on irrigating landscaping and it can happen before 10 a.m. or after 6 p.m., which are the cooler portions of the day when water is less conditioned to evaporate. Golf courses, commercial growers or nurseries are exempt from this, however.

And absolutely no washing your own car at your house, which is bad for the environment anyway. Commercial car washes are there for a reason (because all the scum, soap, oil and grease will run to the storm drain, which runs straight to the ocean). 

Poway’s water district voted earlier this week to adopt similar stricter water use rules. Vallecitos Water District Board moved to Level 2 drought restrictions back in April.

Council President Sean Elo-Rivera speaks at a press conference on Feb. 7, 2022, about budget priorities for the San Diego City Council. / Photo by Adriana Heldiz

Council President Pushing Pilot to Help Renters Keep Their Homes

Council President Sean Elo-Rivera said Thursday he’ll push to add a pilot program to support San Diegans who’d otherwise fall short on rent to the city’s budget when the City Council votes on the spending plan on Monday.

If approved, the pilot program would provide monthly rental subsidies of up to $500 for up to 24 months and target seniors, families with children, people with disabilities and youth up to 25 years old.

In a report issued Wednesday, the city’s Office of the Independent Budget Analyst recommended including $3.6 million in the city budget to serve about 300 households via the so-called Housing Stability Fund, as requested by most councilmembers.

The rental subsidy proposal that Elo-Rivera has been rallying behind for months wasn’t included in the mayor’s initial or revised budget though eight councilmembers voiced their support for it.Elo-Rivera said he thinks revenues that are coming in higher than initially projected should make it feasible for the City Council to bake the new program into their budget.

“What I’m confident my colleagues and I will do is make responsible adjustments to the budget that will go forward to the mayor and we’ll see what he thinks of those,” Elo-Rivera said.

Elo-Rivera, who also successfully pushed for a no-fault eviction moratorium earlier this year, said Thursday he is convinced the city needs to step up its efforts to prevent homelessness. 

In Other News 

The Morning Report was written by MacKenzie Elmer and Lisa Halverstadt. It was edited by Andrea Lopez-Villafaña. 

Correction: This post was updated with information on water use restrictions. Those include a three-days-per-week limit on irrigating landscaping and it can happen before 10 a.m. or after 6 p.m.

Join the Conversation

3 Comments

  1. There’s a typo in today’s morning report, in the story about new water restrictions. It reads:

    “New restrictions include a three-days-per-week limit on irrigating landscaping and it can’t happen before 10 a.m. or after 6 p.m”

    It should read:
    “New restrictions include a three-days-per-week limit on irrigating landscaping and it can’t happen after 10 a.m. or before 6 p.m”

  2. “Commercial car washes are there for a reason (because all the scum, soap, oil and grease will run to the storm drain, which runs straight to the ocean).”
    so it’s better to have all that go directly to the ocean rather than to wastewater treatment first??

  3. SDCC D2 Special interests, lobbyists, elites, powerful and prominent citizens know the dumbness of voters. Believe your eyes. I spent less than one dollar a vote whereas the second-place finisher spent over 35 dollars a vote. She only beat me by about 5800 votes. It pays to know very powerful important people. My papa from Poland knew nobody. Like father like son. Dan Smiechowski

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